What person or group made it? Often this is not known. If there is a name, refer to this person as the artist or architect, not “author.” Refer to this person by his or her last name, not first name. For example, say Kahlo, rather than Frida.

Words: 388
Pages: 2
Subject: Art

1. One-Page Proposal

• The one-page proposal should open with a short paragraph (150-200 words) addressing the following questions about the object that you selected. This information should come from the object’s label at the museum/website and can be based on information provided by the readings and lectures assigned in class.

a. What is the name of the object that you chose?

b. Who or what is represented?

c. When was it made? Is it a copy of something older? Was it made before or modeled after similar works?

d. What person or group made it? Often this is not known. If there is a name, refer to this person as the artist or architect, not “author.” Refer to this person by his or her last name, not first name. For example, say Kahlo, rather than Frida.

e. Where was it made? For whom? Is it typical of the art of a geographical area or time period?

f. What materials is it made of? How big or small is it?

g. Does the viewer look up toward it or down at it? If it is not in its original location, does the viewer see it as the artist intended? Can it be seen on all sides or just on one? (this applies to in-person visits)

• In a different sentence, clearly state what you are going to argue about this work based on the visual information provided by the piece and on the art historical knowledge that you have acquired in the class. Do not Google or do outside research about this work.

a. To easily create a visual argument for your paper, depart from the following formula: This paper argues that + name of chosen artwork + action verb + complement. The artwork’s +visual element + visual element+ visual element + demonstrate this claim.

b. Examples:

i. This paper argues that the Mona Lisa depicts a pregnant woman. The artwork’s visual triangular position, naturalism, and the woman’s pose demonstrate this claim.
ii. This paper argues that the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel evinces Michelangelo’s romantic history with men. The artwork’s naturalism, use of organic shapes, and poses demonstrate this claim.
iii. This paper argues that the School of Athens demonstrates the malecentric culture of the Renaissance. The artwork’s subject matter, composition, and historical context demonstrate this claim.