Explain the differing positions between federalism and anti-federalism in Virginia during the debate over ratifying the U.S. Constitution.

Description

ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTIONS

The student will compile an annotated bibliography that contains two scholarly articles he/she may use for the research paper due in Module/Week 7. Following each citation, the student must include a brief paragraph (around 150 words) that summarizes the article and explains its relevance to the chosen research paper prompt. The student will then provide both an integrated quotation and a paraphrase from the article that the student may be able to incorporate into the research paper, both footnoted in Turabian style.

The articles must be sources the student can use for the research paper, where the student will select ONE (1) of the topics below and fully address all the questions it contains:

Explain the differing positions between federalism and anti-federalism in Virginia during the debate over ratifying the U.S. Constitution.

How did these differing viewpoints concerning the role of the federal government linger through the state during the Antebellum era? What 20th century (1900s) political debates in Virginia also had their roots in that disagreement?

Annotated Bibliography Format

Title Page

Include the school’s name, your paper’s title, my name, your name, the course’s title, and the submission date. See this sample title page for a visual.

Bibliography

Citation for Article 1 (in alphabetical order of author’s last name).

Brief paragraph summarizing the article and explaining its relevance to the topic.

An integrated quote from the article.

A paraphrase of a point from the article.

Citation for Article 2 (in alphabetical order of author’s last name).

Brief paragraph summarizing the article and explaining its relevance to the topic.

An integrated quote from the article.

A paraphrase of a point from the article.

Annotated Bibliography Sample Entry

Norris, Caroline. “A History of Madness.” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 125, no. 2 (2017): 138-182.

Norris uses four prominent Virginia lunatic asylums as examples of the changing social and medical trends through Virginia’s history as Virginians have attempted to care for those whose mental states could lead to potential violence toward themselves or others. She considers the state’s historic and ongoing efforts to manage mental illness. Starting with colonial attempts to address the issue, Norris moves through Virginia’s evolving attitudes toward the clinically insane from the earliest asylums’ prison-like atmospheres to the “moral management” approaches of the late 19th century to the current methods of deinstitutionalization. Norris concludes that the problems of the clinically insane are both individual and societal and full of complexities that require ongoing efforts to address. Norris’s research on the history of the insane in Virginia offers a unique look at mental health care in the state. This will support research on the topic of Virginia’s public versus private institutional systems of care by addressing the subject of mental health.

Integrated quotation:

While philosophies over how to care for clinically insane patients differed over time, throughout their histories the asylums benefited “by having a dedicated, energetic, and humane superintendent, professionally capable and devoted to providing the best and most careful treatment to his patients”.

Paraphrase:

Norris argues that modern approaches to caring for the clinically insane reflect many that were present in the colonial era, from high suicide rates and difficulty getting professional help for the mentally ill who lack the necessary funds, to their widespread imprisonment and the societal stigma against them.